Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #1, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #2, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #3, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #8, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #9, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #16, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #30, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #32, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #41, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #46, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #47, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #48, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #51, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #52, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, #53, 2011

collage, digital print

34 x 43 in. (86 x 109 cm)

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, 2011

installation at Corkin Gallery

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, 2011

installation at Corkin Gallery

Astman, Barbara

Daily Collage, 2011

installation at Corkin Gallery

Barbara Astman

Daily Collage, 2011

 

Barbara Astman developed Daily Collage out of her ongoing habit of reading the daily newspapers, as interested in the visual imagery as the newsworthy articles.  She made a collage everyday in her small notebook from cutting and pasting these disparate images and outputting them digitally.

 

The collages do not attempt to create logical narratives nor do they attempt to comment on the news of the day. Instead, Astman playfully harnesses seemingly disparate visual material creating juxtapositions which comment on the proliferation and total saturation of modern media.  Random images of consumption (a cold beer, a slice of pizza, and a diamond ring) are placed next to government figures and celebrities, all there to be digested on an equal plane, the stuff of trivia.  Geopolitical figures are displayed in a casual note-book format.  Astman is interested in how images from the media inform our thoughts. The ghosting from one page to the next provides the idea that news is a continuum.

 

Astman responds to the images with a quick intuitive approach.  The result is a series of improvised compositions hinting at the gluttony of our media environment while maintaining editorial distance.  The work expands on some of the ideas explored in her previous 2006 series: Newspaper. Astman is interested in society's obsession with media as well as her own.