Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Bent Out of Shape #2, 1998

gelatin silver print

20 x 16 in. (51 x 41 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Bent Out of Shape, 1998

gelatin silver print

20 x 16 in. (51 x 41 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Embrace, 1998

gelatin silver print

20 x 16 in. (51 x 41 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Ladyslipper Full Monty, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Rude Water Plant, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Grey Beach, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Sicilian Zucchini #2, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Sicilian Zucchini #5, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Superior in a Bad Mood, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Thick Morning at Pukaskwa, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Yellow Dock Lily, 1998

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (41 x 51 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Ribbons, 1998

gelatin silver print assemblage

29.25 x 43.5 in. (74 x 110 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Deer Requiem Totem, 1998

gelatin print assemblage

12.25 x 17.25 in. (31 x 44 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Labrador in Reverse Meditating, 1998

gelatin silver print assemblage

43.5 x 29.25 in. (110 x 74 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Moccassin Orchid Totem, 1988

gelatin silver print assemblage

45.5 x 31.25 in. (116 x 79 cm)

Marino, Carol

Flora and Fauna, Wood Ducks Silver Evening, 1998

gelatin silver print assemblage

43.5 x 29.25 in. (110 x 74 cm)

In reaction to the industrial landscape of Pittsburgh, where she grew up, Marino responds to her present, comparatively untouched environment with a certain instinctive attachment to it. Photographing near and around her home in northern Ontario, she focuses on flora and fauna in their natural habitats. For her, photography is a vehicle to express her concern for and engagement with her natural surroundings and her work often shows the influence of artists such as Edward Weston or Imogen Cunningham, particularly in its sensuality.  

Marino generally makes only a single print from each negative, often grouping three or four images together to create assemblages. The occasional addition of patterned colour-pigmented borders that photographically incorporate natural materials such as plants, insects or feathers further connects her photographs to their original environment. 

 

Carol Marino has been exhibiting since 1973. Her work is included in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography.