276, 2003

Mädler, Frank

276, 2003

analogue colour print 

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Renault, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Renault, 2003

analogue colour print

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Kultivierte Landschaft II, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Kultivierte Landschaft II, 2003

analogue colour print 

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Fisch, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Fisch, 2003

analogue colour print

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Iznajar, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Iznajar, 2003

analogue colour print

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Überwiegend rot, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Überwiegend rot, 2003

analogue colour print 

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Ein Strauch, Zwei Vögel, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Ein Strauch, Zwei Vögel, 2003

analogue colour print

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Gefälle, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Gefälle, 2003

analogue colour print

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Windrad, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Windrad, 2003

analogue colour print

4 x 6 ft. (1.2 x 1.8 m)

Vögel I + II, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Vögel I + II, 2003

analogue colour print

2.8 x 8.5 ft. (0.9 x 2.6 m)

Garten, 2003

Mädler, Frank

Garten, 2003

analogue colour print

6.1 x 4.1 ft. (1.85 x 1.24 m)

Mädler, Frank

Wege, 2003

installation at Corkin Gallery

Mädler, Frank

Wege, 2003

installation at Corkin Gallery

Mädler, Frank

Wege, 2003

installation at Corkin Gallery

Mädler, Frank

Wege, 2003

installation at Henckenhauer

Frank Mädler
Wege, 2003

 

Frank Mädler shows us that the composition of an image can reflect a specific moment in time and simultaneously be a symbolic representation of reality. Without forcing it, his prints convey the notion that a good photograph is always open to interpretation. The degree of ambivalence in the image is such that, even when you consider it from a strictly representational point of view, you can still extract multiple meanings from it.

 

Concrete motifs, like birds, wind mills, sheep, even cars, separate and create a balance between the two realms in which the work operates: complete abstraction and concrete representation. These artifacts are symbols of the transient and the temporal. What one can see in Mädler’s photographs is the process of compressing and stretching time.