Kertész, André

Hungary, Buda, 1920

gelatin silver print

6 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (16.5 x 21 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Budapest, 1917

gelatin silver print

1 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (3.8 x 5.7 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, untitled (man sleeping at desk), Budapest

gelatin silver print

13 3/4 x 10 in. (34.9 x 25.4 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Circus, Budapest, April 27 1920

gelatin silver print

10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Budapest, 1924

contact silver print

2 x 1 1/2 in. (5.1 x 3.8 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, untitled, Budapest, 1914

gelatin silver print

2 1/4 x 1 1/2 in. (5.7 x 3.8 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, untitled, c.1980

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, untitled (sheep in group), n.d.

gelatin silver print

7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (19.7 x 24.8 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Pustra, 1914

gelatin silver print

7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (20 x 25 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, My Brother Eugenie, 1919

gelatin silver print

8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Feeding Ducks, Tisza Szalka, 1924

gelatin silver print

7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (20 x 25 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Clochard, 1916

gelatin silver print

2 1/8 x 1 1/2 in. (5.4 x 3.8 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Countryside, 1920

contact silver print

1 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (4.5 x 6.3 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Abony, 1921

gelatin silver print

9 5/8 x 7 3/8 in. (24.4 x 18.7 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Swimming, 1919

gelatin silver print

8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Underwater Swimmer, Eztergom, 1917

gelatin silver print

16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm)

Kertész, André

Hungary, Sunset, Esztergom, 1917

gelatin silver print

7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (19.7 x 24.8 cm)

André Kertész 

 

André Kertész is known for his lyrical, spontaneous pictures of everyday life. His groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay exerted a strong influence on 20th-century magazine photography.  Hungarian born Kertész moved to New York in 1936, having spent 1925-1936 in Paris at the centre of the émigré art world. He was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th Century.

 

 

Kertész’s photographs reflect a modernist stance that is a combination of realism, lyricism and objectivity in which space, patterns and juxtapositions become significant ways of seeing the world. He once remarked that, "Everybody can look, but they don’t necessarily see."