Ansel Adams

            American, 1902-1984

 

With more than half a century of camera work behind him, Ansel Adams stands as one of America’s greatest landscape photographers. His career is punctuated with countless elegant, handsomely composed and technically flawless photographs of magnificent natural landscapes. Adams would bring public recognition to the art of photography and taught widely the techniques of black and white photography.

 

Striking photographs of Yosemite and the surrounding Sierra Nevada capturing the elusive visual myth and mood of these wild places brought Adams widespread popular acclaim. His intimate understanding and passion for conservation of this pristine wilderness gave Adams the energy and tenacity needed to bring subjects to life for a larger public. While Adams is probably best known for his images of the Sierra Nevadas and Yosemite he had a much wider body of work. Working with Dorothea Lange, Adams created various image sets for Time magazine. The subject of these images ranged from water rights struggles to the Mormons of Utah. Adams also recorded the Japanese American interment camps from World War II

 

 

 

In addition to the photographs themselves, Adams contributed to the growing field of photography in his development of the “zone system” relating to exposure and development before computerized light meters and developing techniques. Adams was also a consultant for companies such as Polaroid and Hasselblad. His reputation has been firmly established by exhibitions in virtually every major American art museum, three Guggenheim Fellowships and numerous publications.